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Shop > Beneficial Insects > Spider Mite Controls

As often found on the undersides of plant leaves, spider mites, also called “webspinning mites”, are common North America, and they attack both indoor and outdoor plants. They are most common in hot, dry conditions, especially where their natural enemies have been killed off by insecticide use.

Pest Description Spider mites have 4 pairs of legs, so they are not true insects, but arachnid, relatives of spiders. Adults are reddish brown or pale in colour, oval-shaped without wings and very small 0.4-0.6 mm long (around 1/50 inch long)- about the size of the period at the end of the sentence. To the naked eye, they look like tiny moving dots.

A female lays six eggs a day, and over lifetime, it lays 100 or more eggs on the undersurface of foliage. Spider mite eggs are spherical and translucent becoming cream coloured before hatching. Young spider mites called larvae resemble their parents except they are way smaller and have only 3 pairs of legs.

The most common spider mite speices is two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch. This mite is oval in shape, about 1/50 inch long and may be brown or orange-red, but a green, greenish-yellow or an almost translucent color is the most common. Overwintering females are orange to orange-red. The body contents (large dark spots) are often visible through the transparent body wall. Since the spots are accumulation of body wastes, newly molted mites may lack the spots.

Spider mite Damage Spider mites have a host range of hundreds of plant species, including all major vegetable crops and many ornamental crops. Each spider mites suck plant fluid from foliage, and large infestations cause visible damage. At first, leaves show patterns of tiny spots. As feeding continues, the leaves turn yellowish or reddish and drop off. The mite activity is visible in the tight webs that are formed under leaves, twigs, and fruit. Damage is usually worse when compounded by water stress.

Tips

  • Spider mites are often difficult to see with the naked eye, but their presence on infested host plants can be detected by holding a white sheet of paper under a branch and tapping the branch against the paper. If mites are present, they will show up on the paper as tiny moving dots.>

PHYTOSEIULUS PERSIMILIS NEW ZEALAND <br> (Predator)
PHYTOSEIULUS PERSIMILIS NEW ZEALAND
(Predator)


<b>NEOSEIULUS CALIFORNICUS</b> <br> (Predator)
NEOSEIULUS CALIFORNICUS
(Predator)


<b>GALANDROMUS OCCIDENTALIS</b> <br> (Predator)
GALANDROMUS OCCIDENTALIS
(Predator)


PHYTOSEIULUS PERSIMILIS <br> (Predator)
PHYTOSEIULUS PERSIMILIS
(Predator)


NEOSEIULUS FALLACIS (AMBLYSEIUS)<br> (Predator)
NEOSEIULUS FALLACIS (AMBLYSEIUS)
(Predator)


SPIDER MITE TRI-PAK <br> (Predator)
SPIDER MITE TRI-PAK
(Predator)


MESOSEIULUS LONGIPES <br> (Predator)
MESOSEIULUS LONGIPES
(Predator)


FELTIELLA ACARISUGA <br> (Ectoparasite)
FELTIELLA ACARISUGA
(Ectoparasite)


STETHORUS PUNCTILLUM <br> (Predator)
STETHORUS PUNCTILLUM
(Predator)


PHYTOSEIULUS PERSIMILIS ON BEAN LEAVES <br> (Predator)
PHYTOSEIULUS PERSIMILIS ON BEAN LEAVES
(Predator)


DICYPHUS HESPERUS <br> (Predator)
DICYPHUS HESPERUS
(Predator)




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